Thirty-Minute Oven-Risen Whole Wheat & White Bread

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1 cup warmed 2% milk
2 tablespoons canola oil
3 teaspoon salt
1 cup warm water to 105-115 degrees
Two and a half teaspoons of active dry yeast
2 tablespoons brown sugar
3 cups cups 100% whole wheat flour
3 cups unbleached all-purpose flour.

Additional water to make a good texture. I added an additional half cup once I incorporated the whole wheat flour to the liquids.

I gradually added in the
all-purpose flour a little bit at a time, with my KitchenAid mixer with the dough hook.

Knead for about 8 to 10 minutes.

Rest for about 5 minutes.

Shape into two large loaves, or you can shape the dough into four smaller ones, adjusting the time that you’ll bake them.

You can bake them on a greased cookie sheet, or you can bake them in greased loaf pans.

Once the loaves are shaped then put them into your cold oven then turn on the heat to 400 degrees.

Leave the loaves in the oven for exactly one minute, then turn the oven off. You heard me – turn the oven off!

Leave the bread loaves in the oven for 30 minutes to rise, and then after the 30 minutes is up- turn the oven on to the 400 degrees again and bake for 45 minutes.

I didn’t need to take any longer than the 45 minutes to bake the two large loaves I baked. In the original recipe book from Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads (which I would suggest to go buy if you love baking bread), it’s awesome; Mr. Clayton’s advice was that if the crust wasn’t done and didn’t feel hard on top-then you could take the bread out of the pans, and then bake an additional 10 minutes.

Mine didn’t need that though.
The 45 minutes was more than enough.

Let rest in the pans for about 5 minutes and then turn over with pot holders and oven mitts on to a clean cotton kitchen towel.

Enjoy this fabulous bread with a wonderful homemade soup and salad and home brewed iced tea and lemon.

Photography by Paulette Motzko, PLM Studios, Las Vegas Nevada
COPYRIGHT April 2016

Paulette L Motzko

April 9th, 2016
7:58 p.m.

This recipe was adapted from Bernard Clayton’s new Complete Book of breads my Paulette Motzko.

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